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Friday, March 9, 2012

Wine Cork and Wine "Cork"

I just learned that some of the wine bottles corks are plastic! Now I'm not talking about the screw caps that some wines has but a cork that looks like a real cork but is more "rubbery", those ones are plastic.


If you want to check up your favorite wine you can go to corkwatch webpage. Not all wines are listed yet but hopefully people will add more as they discover what corks are in the bottle they just bought.

I also just learned that normal corks are sustainable since it is only the bark from the cork oak used when producing cork and the trees are left to grow new bark.

I remember reading somewhere that wine corks should not go into the compost bin. It must have been because of the plastic cork, I don't see why a normal cork could not be composted, or does anyone else know more on this?
Many people are under the assumption that cork trees must be cut down to make cork products, but nothing could be further from the truth.  Cork is the bark of the cork oak, which is harvested manually and grows back to produce new cork for generation after generation.  The cork industry supports the existence of cork forests, which are home to several endangered species, and which could otherwise be cut down to make way for less sustainable products if the cork market did not exist.  I think anything that promotes the existence of old growth forests is a good thing.
Many people are under the assumption that cork trees must be cut down to make cork products, but nothing could be further from the truth.  Cork is the bark of the cork oak, which is harvested manually and grows back to produce new cork for generation after generation.  The cork industry supports the existence of cork forests, which are home to several endangered species, and which could otherwise be cut down to make way for less sustainable products if the cork market did not exist.  I think anything that promotes the existence of old growth forests is a good thing.

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